TTh 3:00-4:15 p.m., Shingleton Hall 8

Monday, February 25, 2013

David's Story Quiz for Monday, February 25th

David's Story cover
Please answer the following quiz questions in a comment to this post. You will begin work in class today. This quiz is open-book, open-notes, open-library, and open for discussion with classmates. You may use Internet sources only if they are online scholarly journals; online scholarly books; or online scholarly collections that end in .gov or .edu. You must cite all sources you use to complete this quiz both in text and in a list of Works Cited at the end of your answers. Collaborations of no more than two classmates will be accepted if both authors' names appear in those comments. This assignment counts as two participation grades. Answers #1-4 are due by class time on Wednesday, 2/27. Answers #5-8 and the Extra Credit are due by class time on Friday, 3/1. Be prepared to discuss the questions, answers, and their significances to the entire novel.
  1. What does David do to the hit list he finds?
  2. What happens during Dulcie's nightly visitations?
  3. What does the narrator practice doing at malls?
  4. Why?
  5. Who is Ouma Ragel's father?
  6. What industry does Thomas try to hire David to join?
  7. Why does David delve so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research?
  8. Why does the narrator abandon the narrative?
Extra Credit (1 point): What South African government policy did Andrew Le Fleur's goal of a separate Griqua homeland prefigure?

23 comments:

  1. David’s Story Quiz: Questions # 1-4

    By Liv

    1. David crosses Dulcie’s name off of the hit list so its makers will believe she has been fatally disposed of. David then scribbles Dulcie’s name on another slip of paper, under which he writes: “It is they who obliterated her name.” Though David refuses to inform the narrator of who “they” are, readers can infer that in writing this, David is either trying to provide an extra layer of protection against the “they” who want to destroy Dulcie, or he could be trying to make himself believe that the makers of the list aren’t his enemies as it was them “who obliterated her name” (117).
    2. During Dulcie’s nightly visitations, unidentifiable individuals torture Dulcie. The torture involves the “insertion of a red-hot poker between the bones” as well as the use of various instruments and electricity to inflict pain. During these episodes of torture, a knife is held at Dulcie’s throat. Wounds are only inflicted on body parts that are later disguised by clothing (119, 178-180).
    3. The narrator practices the ‘art of walking’ at malls (201).
    4. The narrator practices walking at malls due to her feeling off-balance and ashamed of how she walks because of the way her body type is perceived in the racist culture she lives in. She feels self-conscious and embarrassed as she compares herself to how someone with the ‘usual body type’ easily moves about in society. She has also both through physical action—such as colliding with people—as well as word-of-mouth and other, more covert forms of prejudice, experienced a reflection of her shame in the judgments of racist others in her maneuvering through the culture in which she lives (201-202).

    Bibliography

    Wicomb, Zoe. David’s Story. New York: Feminist P, 2000. Print.

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    1. David’s Story Questions # 5-8 and Extra Credit

      By Liv

      5) Though there is speculation of the truthfulness of Ouma Ragel’s tales, there is evidence that supports that Andrew Le Fleur was her father. From birth, she had the “brilliant green” eyes, a trait of the Le Fleur family. Another piece of evidence is the Chief’s strong fondness for Antjie, Ouma Ragel’s mother. Also, David admits that he has noticed that he himself has a remarkable resemblance to Le Fleur (Wicomb 158).
      6) Thomas tries to get David to join the illegal diamond smuggling organization called IDB (169, 237).
      7) David becomes so immersed in Le Fleur/Griqua research, because he is fascinated with memories he had of Le Fleur when he was young. Understanding the mystery involving his relatives’ association with Le Fleur (144).
      8) The narrator abandons the narrative because she suddenly sees her work as incomprehensible. She feels her voice doesn’t matter, and because of this, she is no longer able to acquire new material, and therefore cannot acknowledge her work as her own (212, 213).
      Extra Credit: Andrew Le Fleur’s goal of a separate Griqua government prefigured the National Party government’s racist policies (223).

      Bibliography
      Wicomb, Zoe. David’s Story. New York: Feminist P, 2000. Print.

      Delete
  2. 1) Once David finds the hit list, he keeps it on his person and scratches out Dulcie's name in order to protect her. Removing Dulcie ensures that if someone were to find the list, they would think Dulcie is already dead and therefore not target her. (pages 115-117)

    2) During the nightly “visitations” Dulcie gets systematically tortured with, for examples, knives and electric shocks. While it is not revealed who the torturers are, they are probably either working for the government and know about Dulcie's involvement in the Movement, or they work for the Movement and suspect Dulcie and David of betrayal. (pages 178-181)

    3 and 4) The narrator practices walking at the malls. She wants to learn how to walk with ease, confidence and a steady step in order to not be pushed around and mocked by other (mostly white) people as she has difficulties walking due to her staetopygic condition. (pages 201-202)

    Sources:
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    2. 5) Ouma Ragel's father is Gert Klaassen, Le Fleur's right hand man in the Griqua settlement. This means that David is a direct descendant of Le Fleur's original secession party, and of Griqua blood. (pages 97, the family tree)

      6) Thomas tries to hire David into the company he works for, which mines and trades diamonds. David turns the offer down, as he sees Thomas as a sell-out who has become unable to distinguish who is his friend and who is his enemy. In other words, he doesn't approve of Thomas working for a company run by the whites. (pages 168-171)

      7) David's interest in Le Fleur and his Griqua nation is partly caused by his wish to get in touch with his roots, and better know who is actually is. South Africa's liberation caused him to feel disillusioned, and he needed to construct a new identity for himself. He also probably partly wishes to get in touch with Dulcie during his research.

      8) At the end of the novel the narrator abandons the story for several reasons. First of all, after David's death she has lost her main source of information; after all, it is David's story. Second, her life is in danger, as she barely survives an assassination attempt which destroys the computer she works on. Third, she feels the story has become too convoluted and fragmented, and therefore impossible to continue. (pages 210-213)

      BONUS) Le Fleur's wish for a separate land for Griquas was the precursor of the South African apartheid policy, evidenced by the line “he offered them Apartheid . . . a separate homeland for a separate Griqua race!” (page 150)

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  3. 1. What does David do to the hit list he finds? When David finds the hit list left in his room (a glaring threat to his life and safety), he scans the names. Upon seeing Dulcie’s name written on the list, he immediately crosses her name off. In doing so, David attempts to protect Dulcie from the evils of those who wish to kill her. David reasons that whoever might come across this list in the future will deduce that Dulcie has already been “taken care of.” The reader then finds that David has copied the name of Dulcie onto another sheet of paper. (Wicomb, 115-117)

    2. What happens during Dulcie's nightly visitations? Despite David’s attempts to protect Dulcie’s well-being, she experiences a world of pain and torture at the hands of unknown assailants during her nightly visitations. Dulcie is mercilessly tortured (a fact that she hides physically and emotionally for her own strength and the strength of the guerilla cause) with a branding iron type of tool, a blade, and with electric shocks. Fear of death does not seem to be a matter which concerns Duclie. Her courage and drive is unending (seemingly reflective of her torture and bodily suffering). (Wicomb, 179-180)

    3. And 4. What does the narrator practice doing at malls? The narrator refines her self described form of walking at local malls (this is largely do a sense of self-conscious judgment she perceives of her own physical inadequacy and awkward presentation). The narrator sees herself as maintaining a noticeably awkward appearance opposed to others in the community (a combination or segregation and handicap). This is clearly representative in the manner in which the narrator carries herself. The narrator rehearses how to walk and act in public in an attempt to fit into a society which does not accept her. Her presence is rejected, and her insecurity is heightened. (Wicomb, 201)

    Works Cited:
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    1. 5. Who is Ouma Ragel's father? Ouma Ragel’s father is Gert Klaassen (Andrew La Fleur is also rumored to be of connection to Ouma Ragel). (Wicomb, Family Tree)

      6. What industry does Thomas try to hire David to join? Thomas attempts to recruit David in the Illegal Diamond Business.

      7. Why does David delve so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research? David begins to research the history of his ancestors, the Griquas, in a search for answers in the past. He is also intrigued by Dulcie’s connections to the Griqua. David is very concerned with helping and protecting Dulcie. He finds interest on the Griquas from the counsel his great grandmother, Ouma Ragel, while he was growing up. He also has a supposed and mysterious link to the great Griqua leader of the homeland movement, Andrew La Fleur. In David’s research that La Fleur was not an honorable leader of peace and justice at all, but a harbinger of the very worldview condoned by the apartheid movement.

      8. Why does the narrator abandon the narrative? The narrator abandons the narrative for two particular reasons. Firstly, the narrator constantly struggles with the legitimacy of her work. Most of what she writes (especially of Duclie) is inferred through David. She is left to fill in the gaps of her narrative with her own perceptions. Although it is not David’s story in particular, it is a story of struggle. Secondly, the narrator abandons the narrative because her computer and its contents are destroyed when it is shot during the writing process.

      Extra Credit (1 point): What South African government policy did Andrew Le Fleur's goal of a separate Griqua homeland prefigure? Apartheid


      Works Cited:
      Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

      Delete
  4. Madison Armstrong
    Renee Reedy
    David’s Story Quiz Questions #1-4

    1. What does David do to the hit list he finds?
    David finds a hit list with both his and Dulcie’s name on it, one after another. David scribbles out Dulcie’s name until it was unrecognizable in case Thomas or anyone else found it. Two names scribbled out, juxtaposed together is suspicious. It’s interesting that David used the word “beloved” to describe Dulcie in this scene, and it’s important that he chose to save Dulcie’s life over his own (Wicomb 114).

    2. What happens during Dulcie's nightly visitations?
    At night, unknown black and white men that Dulcie may be familiar with torture her. They claim that rape would be too kind, so they electrocute and beat her (Wicomb 178). Dulcie mentally detaches herself from the torture; if she can move after they leave, she tries to follow and shoot them (Wicomb 181). For some reason, Dulcie’s nightly visits seem to correspond with David’s mood towards her (Wicomb 184).

    3/4. What does the narrator practice doing at malls? Why?
    Zoe Wicomb practices walking purposefully to the point of collision in a walking mall, like the white businessmen she sees. Wicomb does this to see if the wealthy men will deviate from their path to accommodate a black woman, who the men view as underprivileged because of her race and gender (Wicomb 201).

    Works Cited
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    1. Madison Armstrong

      5. Ouma Ragel’s biological father is Andrew Abraham Stockenstrom Le Fleur, not her mom’s husband, Gert Klaassen.

      6. Thomas tries to hire David into the South African diamond trade. Thomas tries to intimidate David through a possibly planted hit list, and by telling David he deserves to make money and live a leisurely life after his service in the Movement (Wicomb 169).

      7. David delves so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research because he believes that his great grandmother, Auntjie Cloete, had an affair with Andrew Abraham Stockenstrom Le Fleur making Le Fleur one of David’s ancestors. They share the same green eyes and religious zeal; both create similar atmospheres of oppression while trying to escape apartheid (Wicomb 156).

      8. Zoe Wicomb abandons the narrative because too many people have vested interest in the book’s contents. David’s family and friends are aware of Wicomb’s research and, assumedly, Dulcie deletes some of Wicomb’s story while she was at David’s funeral. After her computer is shot, it felt dangerous to continue David’s Story when David’s Story is a story that belongs to many people (213).

      Extra Credit: The President’s Commission? (Moncrieffe 166)

      Works Cited

      Moncrieffe, Joy. The Power of Labeling: How People Are Categorized and Why It Matters. London: Earthscan, 2007. 166. Web.

      Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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  6. Carissa and Logan

    1. David crosses out Dulcie’s name in order to protect her. He also writes her name on a different sheet of paper. This way she is not on the hit list and people will already think she is dead.

    2. During Dulcie’s nightly visitations she gets tortured with knives and electric shock. She does not seem to be afraid because she is hiding her pain for the cause.

    3 and 4. The narrator practices walking at the malls. She is trying to walk like a confident woman. She does this to better fit in with society. She feels like she does not fit in and looks strange to society so this is just one way she was trying to make herself “better”.


    Works Cited
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    1. Carissa and Logan again


      5. Ouma Ragels father is Gert Klassen.

      
6. The industry that Thomas tries to hire David to join is the diamond buying business.

      7. David delves so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research is because of his Dulcie knew Griqua and David was connect to Dulcie.

      
8. The narrator abandons the narrative because her computer was shot and destroyed and because she is always trying to fill in the gaps with the information David does not provide.

      
Extra Credit (1 point): Apartheid

      Works Cited: 
Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.


      Delete
  7. 1. David crosses out Dulcie's name with a blue ballpoint pen repeatively.Then he write Dulcie's name on another sheet of paperand writes, " It is they who obliterated her name"(117).

    2. Dulcie's nightly vistations involve torturing physically and emotionally by electric shock and knives. I believe the torturing is being performed by the Government.

    3. The narrator practices the "complexities of walking" at the mall(201).

    4. The narrator practices posture through walking because she feels clumsy, and in fear of being knocked down. Because of her Staetopygic condition, practicing her walking will allow her to develop confidence.

    Works Cited
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    1. 5. Ouma Ragel's father is Gert Klaassen. I found that from the family tree in the beginning of the novel.

      6. The Industry Thomas wants David apart of is the IDB Business ( Illegal Diamond Business).

      7. David delves into La Fleur/Griqua research because of the protection and involvement of Dulcie.

      8. The narrator abandons the narrative because her computer was shot at during her writing and also she had doubts of if people would read her book and if what she wrote was of any importance.

      Works Cited
      Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

      Delete
  8. 1.David saw Dulcie’s name on the hitlist and he then crossed out Dulcie’s name repeatedly so that anyone who looks at the hit list will not recognize her name and therefore think that there is one less person to murder (Wicomb, 117). David then wrote Dulcie’s name on a piece of paper and wrote, “It is they who obliterate her name” (Wicomb, 117). What David means by this notion of “they” is that someone else erased her name from the hit list figuratively even though David crossed out her name physically.

    2. During Dulcie’s nightly visitations is that she is tortured by electrocution and with a knife. The people torturing Dulcie could possibly be members of the government or policemen that are very pro-Apartheid. This is because on page 180 it mentions her life being “devoted to resisting tyranny” (Wicomb, 180). The tyranny is of course the oppressors who believe it is their duty to keep members of their society out of power, separated from another sector or their community and oppressed.

    3. At the malls the narrators practices her walking skills. The narrator does this by marking her path, lifting her chin, fixing her eyes on a landmark and not becoming out of focus with the landmark (Wicomb, 201).

    4. The narrator practices her walking skills because there are some people who, “stride purposely” (Wicomb, 201). Unlike those who stride purposely, the narrator believes she walks rather clumsily because she walks in zigzags (Wicomb, 201). The reason behind her practicing her walking is because she wants to clear her head of Dulcie’s story and separate herself from reality (Wicomb, 202). By walking in a clear and precise path, her mentalitiy will become clearer and she can press onward with David’s Story.

    Works Cited
    Wicomb, Zoë. David’s Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2001. Print

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    1. 5. Ouma Ragel’s father is Gert Klassen.

      6. The industry that Thomas tries to hire David to join is in the illicit diamond buying business or IDB (237).

      7. David delves so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research is because of his involvement with Dulcie.

      8. The narrator abandons the narrative because someone had shot her computer (213).

      Extra Credit (1 point): What South African government policy did Andrew Le Fleur's goal of a separate Griqua homeland prefigure? The African Political Organization or APO (254).

      Works Cited
      Wicomb, Zoë. David’s Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2001. Print

      Delete
  9. 1) David crosses Dulcie's name off the hit list, because he is shocked at seeing her name right under his. He is torn between his emotions and his duty.

    2) Dulcie is tortured and harrassed during the nightly visitations. The torturers are trying to keep a low profile, by not revealing their identity.

    3/4) The narrator walks around at malls to build confidence and get used to walking around busy, well-off people who are not always going to show her courtesy.

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  10. 1) This is a multiple stage question. At first he does nothing with it, simply pondering its origin and purpose. Questioning its validity whether it is a genuine list of those that are to be slain, or simply a scare tactic. Briefly he even entertains that it might be for him alone to scare him. But he dismisses those thoughts to think on them and later decides the list is indeed genuine and as such he is scared to effect the list too greatly. The list is "inviolable like the tokolos" (116). So he opts to only make a single change, and that change alone he fears may have repercussions. He writes her name on a separate piece of paper, seemingly as a form of justification, but more so a reminder of what he is fighting for. "It is they who obliterate her name" (117).

    2) Dulcie is tortured on her nightly visits. The men torture her in all manner of ways "that which is done to food, to flesh - tenderize, baste, sear, seal, sizzle, score, chop" (178). The only action the men do not take upon her is rape because it will "teach her nothing, leave nothing" (178). Though her visitors are not always the victors. When they come for her and do not break her enough before departing "she gathers her magical strength to chase after her visitors, and on such occasions her legendary marksmanship does not fail" (181).

    3+4) The narrator practices walking, in a fashion. An act that many would consider childishly simple, but to the narrator it is so much more than simply walking. It is an exercise in confidence and overcoming her self view of clumsy and having a figure with derogatory connotations, "steatopygous" (201). By fixing her goal on a point and walking without deviation, as she watches others do, she is attempting to take control of her journey and force others to step aside for her, not to be the one that must always step aside.

    Works Cited
    Wicomb, Zoë. David's Story. New York: The Feminist Press, 2000. Print.

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    1. 5) Ouma Ragel's father is Gert Klassen.

      6) Thomas attempts to get David into the diamond business. He very particularly picks him out. Based on what he 'knows' of David and implies it is hard to discern if he wants him as an overseer or perhaps as a trafficker. David of course refuses first by deception, then by superstition, and finally by force.

      7) David's interest in the Griqua/Le Fleur development is partly for understanding, to see what it is that has come before them. But also because of Dulcie and his interest in her.

      8) The narrator abandons the narrative out of fear. Her computer is shot at the end, and she consumed by the shock of what she is a part of by simply telling a story, denies her own work. "I will have nothing more to do with it. I wash my hands of this story" (213). All the way along she struggles to keep telling this story, wanting to give it up in the face of David's attitude, but struggles on because she is telling a story that must be told. When her life is threatened and she is on the same front lines as the characters in her story she fears that change will not come. That she will never "be heard above the rude buzz of bluebottles" (213). And so she disowns her own shattered work.

      Delete
  11. 5) Gert

    6) illegal diamond buying

    7) because he talked about with Ouma Ragel growing up about the subject, and because of Dulcie's involvement.

    8) because her computer was shot

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  12. David's Story Quiz

    1. What does David do with the hit list?
    He marks out Dulcie's name until "it can no longer be recognized" (117) and then writes it on another sheet of paper.

    2. Wat happens during Dulcie's nightly visitations?
    She is tortured and electrocuted night after night in an attempt to drive her to suicide. (178-180)

    3-4. What does the narrator practice at malls? Why?
    She practices her walking skills. In the past, she has been in the practice of weaving around other people but now she is working on building her confidence, walking a straight line, and forcing others to swerve out of her way instead. (201-202)

    5. Who is Ouma Ragel's father?
    According the the family tree at the front of the book, Ragel's father is Gert Klassen. However, her mother also had an affair with Andrew le Fleur.

    6. What industry does Thomas try to hire David to join?
    He tries to get David to join the diamond industry to "replace a key figure" (169).

    7. Why does David delve so deeply into Le Fleur/Griqua research?
    David delves into this research because it is part of his own history and getting in touch with his roots, as his great-grandmother Antjie Cloete was involved with Andrew le Fleur, the leader of the Griquas.

    8. Why does the narrator abandon the narrative?
    The narrator abandons her "impossible story" (212) in shock after her computer is shot. This takes place just after David apparently commits suicide (211) and the narrator is wondering if anyone even cares about what she has written or if it will ever be heard (213).

    +1. What South African government policy did Andrew le Fleur's goal of a separate Griqua homeland prefigure?
    Andrew le Fleur "offered [policymakers] Apartheid, reinterpreted his own words to suit a new belief in separate development...a separate homeland for a separate Grique race" (150).

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  13. 5.) Ouma Regal’s father is known to be Gert Klaassen from the family tree in the beginning of the book but on page 154 in the novel, Antjie has an affair with Chief le Fleur.
    6.) Thomas attempts to hire David to work in the diamond industry to smuggle diamonds into different areas because of how much David already travels, as well as already having training in the Movement with the need to remain inconspicuous.
    7.) While fighting for the liberation movement, David wanted to learn more about his own person roots. Due to Antjie’s affair with Le Fleur, David believes that is part of his family roots, which explains why he delves so deep into the research of Le Fleur and the Griquas.
    8.) The narrator abandons the narrative because while working on it, her computer gets shot and destroyed which doesn’t exactly bring about a sense of calmness or security, so she stops writing the narrative before it’s too late.

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  14. 1. crosses her name out
    2. torture
    3. walking a straight line
    4. assert her status as human and, thus, her right-of-way among whites
    5. Officially: Gert Klassen. Biological and rumored evidence suggests Andrew Le Fleur.
    6. diamonds
    7. his roots, including Le Fleur's connection to his ancestry
    8. death threat
    XC. apartheid

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